Ligonier

The Glory of Plodding

by Jason Moore on May 20, 2010

by Kevin DeYoung
published without modification. Originally published HERE.

It’s sexy among young people — my generation — to talk about ditching institutional religion and starting a revolution of real Christ-followers living in real community without the confines of church. Besides being unbiblical, such notions of churchless Christianity are unrealistic. It’s immaturity actually, like the newly engaged couple who think romance preserves the marriage, when the couple celebrating their golden anniversary know it’s the institution of marriage that preserves the romance. Without the God-given habit of corporate worship and the God-given mandate of corporate accountability, we will not prove faithful over the long haul.
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1,500 per month

by Jason Moore on December 16, 2009

December 2009 TableTalk AdEvery month, 1,500 pastors leave the ministry.

It’s true. One thousand, five hundred pastors leave the ministry every month due to moral failure, spiritual burnout, or contention in their congregations.

With the establishment of the Ligonier Academy of Biblical & Theological Studies, Ligonier will be able to fulfill a great need that exists among Christian pastors — the need for lifelong, continuing biblical and theological education. The need for direction and leadership. The hope for personal fulfillment through the glorious work of God. We are excited about the future because we serve a great and sovereign God. And we know what we are called to do.

For more info visit www.ligonieracademy.org

*found in december 2009 issue of TableTalk Magazine. All rights remain the property of TableTalk…

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80% in 5 Years

by Jason Moore on October 19, 2009

So I’m reading my October copy of TableTalk magazine and I see this ad. Nothing particularly exciting about the design of the ad; Although it was well designed. Ligonier’s stuff always looks clean and is well thought out. What struck me was the content.

Below the “title” of the ad, there is contained this chilling message

80% of seminary and bible school graduates leave the ministry within the first 5 years.

Eighty percent. Why is that? And what can we do about it? Through Ligonier Academy of Biblical & Theological Studies, we will be able to fulfill a great need that exists among Christian pastors – the need for lifelong, continuing education from world class pastors and theologians. The need for direction and leadership. The hope for fulfillment through the glorious work of God. We are excited about the future because we serve a great and sovereign God. And we know what we are called to do. The church needs reformation. Ligonier Academy can help.

WOW. Needless to say, while  I understand it’s an ad to draw people to their program, I was blown away at the stat. Rather than have any body text, maybe it would have been better to draw them to an online site called 80percentin5years.com … Regardless of the strategy in delivery, the fact is chilling. What does cause it? What do you think? Is it a lack of calling on peoples lives that are going into ministry? Or are we so weak in our faith, that we run at the first sign of trouble? Are we trusting in the Lord for Salvation, but not our day-to-day struggles? Is that even possible? Is there sin that removes our eligibility from serving in this area?

What if the apostle Paul walked away from ministry after only 5 years? Eek. The Lord’s will is going to be fulfilled but how many believers are disqualified, a la 1 Cor 9:24-27?

I don’t know the answers. I am only guessing. But people that know me, know I would like to see some sort of FT ministry opportunity come into the picture for me, should God’s will be done and He be glorified. I wait patiently. What concerns me is the failure rate. Are God’s people that self-sufficient? That’s a mirage. Each believer has no sufficiency in their self. Each situation must be specific to the person’s involved but is it fair to say that it exists because of a lack of sensitivity to the Lord’s will?

BUT LET HIM ASK IN FAITH, WITH NO DOUBTING. James 1:6

Let us be in prayer for our pastors and servants. Lord give us ears to hear and eyes to see.

if you want to check out more on Ligonier Academy, click here.

(originally published in October 2009 issue of TableTalk Magazine…meaning, I didn’t come up with it, or own it. All rights belong to Ligonier Academy)

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Is the Reformation Over?

by Jason Moore on September 10, 2009

by R.C. Sproul

originally posted at: ligonier.org

Is the Reformation over? There have been several observations rendered on this subject by those I would call “erstwhile evangelicals.” One of them wrote, “Luther was right in the sixteenth century, but the question of justification is not an issue now.” A second self-confessed evangelical made a comment in a press conference I attended that “the sixteenth-century Reformation debate over justification by faith alone was a tempest in a teapot.” Still another noted European theologian has argued in print that the doctrine of justification by faith alone is no longer a significant issue in the church. We are faced with a host of people who are defined as Protestants but who have evidently forgotten altogether what it is they are protesting.

The question, “what must I do to be saved?” is still a critical question for any person who is exposed to the wrath of God.

Contrary to some of these contemporary assessments of the importance of the doctrine of justification by faith alone, we recall a different perspective by the sixteenth-century magisterial Reformers. Luther made his famous comment that the doctrine of justification by faith alone is the article upon which the church stands or falls. John Calvin added a different metaphor, saying that justification is the hinge upon which everything turns. In the twentieth century, J.I. Packer used a metaphor indicating that justification by faith alone is the “Atlas upon whose shoulder every other doctrine stands.” Later Packer moved away from that strong metaphor and retreated to a much weaker one, saying that justification by faith alone is “the fine print of the gospel.”
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